Humane Animal Removal

Long before your house was built, wild animals once called that space home. As more natural habitat is reconstructed for human use, animals are forced into closer contact with humans. Animals perceive humans as predators. When you find an animal in your home, it is often more scared of you than you are of it.

How to Remove an Animal Humanely

  1. Often, the best thing to do is to turn off the lights in the room where the animal is located. Block off access to the rest of the house while allowing for an exit point to the outdoors, such as an open window or door.
  2. Leave the room or area of the house for approximately 30 minutes to allow time for that animal to find its way out.
  3. If the animal is still in the room after some time has elapsed, it can be gently herded towards the exit from a safe distance using a sheet or towel.
  4. If the animal has not left, use humane traps and removal services to relocate these animals to a safer location.

How to Remove a Deceased Animal

If an animal is already dead, the property owner is responsible for disposing of the remains.

  • Often, you can place the animal remains in a garbage bag.
  • Take the bagged remains to an animal shelter for disposal, or bury the bagged remains at least 6 inches deep, away from roads, sidewalks, trails and bodies of water.
  • If a large animal is a traffic hazard, contact your city, county or state highway department. In the case of a dead bear, contact the NC Wildlife Resources Commission at (800) 662-7137.

Humane Traps PWC has one Havahart © trap available to borrow free of charge, although we cannot guarantee there will be one available when you need it.  Companies such as Havahart© manufacture humane traps, which can be purchased at local home improvement stores. Visit the Havahart website at http://www.havahart.com/.

Humane Removal Services

PWC does not perform animal removals and recommends the following humane removal services:

  • Triangle Wildlife Removal, Inc: (919) 661-0722
  • Critter Control (Durham): (919) 382-0651

Back to Injured Wildlife